Issue for the week of July 13th, 2013

Sunday, June 30th 2013. | Science News

  • Bohr’s revolutionary atomic theory turns 100. (p. 20)

  • Cicadas’ odd life cycle poses evolutionary conundrums. (p. 26)

  • New formula relates city size to infrastructure, productivity. (p. 5)

  • Females can use sperm months after mates go belly up. (p. 8)

  • Ancient fossils reveal surprises about early vertebrate necks, abdominal muscles. (p. 8)

  • Famous for speed, the big cats actually rely on acceleration and maneuverability to capture prey. (p. 9)

  • Using everyday materials, two research teams conceal ordinary objects by guiding light around them. (p. 10)

  • To record size and shape of a room, researchers use a speaker, five microphones and some math. (p. 10)

  • Experimental microchip improves reliability and speed of writing and reading data. (p. 11)

  • Ocean acidification could hamper larvae’s growth. (p. 12)

  • Orbiting camera detects reflected light to determine the extent of the planet’s vegetation. (p. 12)

  • Throat movements get decoded to reveal sounds of speech. (p. 13)

  • Selections from the meeting held June 2-7 in Montreal include personal listening zones in cars and music of the body. (p. 13)

  • Stem cells spur return of amputated digits in mice (p. 14)

  • No strong signs of canine ancestry among living grey wolves. (p. 14)

  • Fluorescent protein binds to bilirubin, a compound the body must eliminate. (p. 15)

  • “BigBrain” model, the most detailed atlas yet, could improve brain scanning tools and neurosurgeons’ navigation. (p. 16)

  • Abnormalities in three brain regions found among those who head the ball most frequently. (p. 18)

  • Genome alterations probably not responsible for decline in disease prevalence. (p. 18)

  • When struck with light, retinal prostheses stimulate animals’ visual cortices. (p. 19)

  • Male chickens lose phalluses before hatching. (p. 19)

  • Proposal would extend protections to both wild and captive primate populations. (p. 19)

  • Angkor, the capital of Cambodia’s Khmer empire, included carefully planned  suburbs that spread across the landscape. (p. 19)

  • A genetic quirk linking snails in two distant areas suggests people brought escargot on their migration to the Emerald Isle. (p. 19)

  • Review by Allison Bohac (p. 30)

  • Review by Erin Wayman (p. 30)

  • Excerpt from the July 13, 1963, issue of Science News Letter (p. 4)

  • (p. 31)

  • The Science Life (p. 32)

  • Related For Issue for the week of July 13th, 2013